MONEY TALKS – BUT BRITS DON’T TALK ABOUT MONEY

  • Almost half (46 per cent) of Brits avoid talking about finances with a partner
  • A third (31 per cent) have a secret savings account from their spouse
  • This reluctance to talk about money means that nearly one in ten (8 per cent) don’t know how much their other half earns
  • In an attempt to promote savvy spending, almost half of Brits (49 per cent) admit to using discount vouchers on a date, but wait until the fifth date before doing so
  • Match has teamed up with Gourmet Society to offer its members a subscription to MatchDining; you can enjoy exclusive discounts on restaurants – from Michelin-starred to family favourite chains

New research from dating site Match has found that almost half of Brits (46 per cent) avoid talking about finances with their partner, with a third (32 per cent) admitting they even have a secret savings account from their spouse. Their reluctance to talk about money means that almost one in 10 (8 per cent) are left completely in the dark about how much their other half earns.

However, almost two fifths of Brits (38 per cent) say they would prefer to earn the same as their partner to avoid arguments over income disparities. The dating expert found that a third of men (33 per cent) still harbour old fashioned ideas when it comes to finances, admitting they want to be the breadwinner in the relationship. A fifth of Brits (21 per cent) would feel inferior if they earned less than their partner, with this being a bigger concern amongst women than men (24 per cent vs. 18 per cent).

Navigating the topic of money starts as early as a first date, and while old-fashioned etiquette experts would argue a gentleman should always pay for a date, two fifths of women (42 per cent) say they will always offer to pay for their half, whereas 35 per cent of men will offer to pay in full as they think it’s polite. One in five women (22 per cent) say they can look after themselves and would never let someone pay for them on a date.

In a bid to promote savvy spending, almost half of Brits (49 per cent) admit to using a discount voucher on a date, particularly as 18 per cent think dating is expensive. But it takes until the fifth date before pulling a coupon out the bag.

As dining out is a key activity for couples on any stage of the dating journey, Match has teamed up with Gourmet Society to offer its members a free annual membership when they sign up to a six-month Match subscription, helping them navigate the financial complications of dating. The MatchDining membership offers 25 per cent off bills at selected restaurants, including everything from Michelin-starred to family favourite chains.

Discover MatchDining https://uk.match.com/p/stc/matchdining/

Match’s dating expert Hayley Quinn says: “Money can be very divisive topic and talking about it can often make people feel uncomfortable and anxious. Unfortunately, this means many couples avoid the subject altogether which in the long run could have a negative impact on the relationship. A true sign of commitment is talking about finances so problems don’t snowball out of control, it also means you can accomplish longer-term goals, such as saving for a holiday, together.

“If you’re active on the dating scene then money is a conversation best not discussed until you’re both comfortable and committed to one another. However, dating doesn’t have to cost the earth – using a discount voucher shows someone who is savvy with their money, which can be a very attractive quality in a potential partner!”

 

Methodology: Based on a survey of 2,042 UK adults undertaken by Ginger Comms between 27th September and 1st October 2019.

Share

Contact



Please leave this field empty.


JPG/PNG/PDF/GIF - maximum size 5MB